Review: Breakable by Aimee L. Salter

Publisher:  Aimee L. Salter

Genre: YA Realistic Fiction, bullying

Series: None

Pages: 340 (eBook)

Release Date: November 4, 2013

Rating: 071913_0709_ReviewThron2.png071913_0709_ReviewThron2.png071913_0709_ReviewThron2.png071913_0709_ReviewThron2.png

Summary from Goodreads:

When seventeen-year-old Stacy looks in the mirror she can see and talk to her future self. “Older Me” has been Stacy’s secret support through the ongoing battle with their neurotic mother, relentless bullying at school, and dealing with her hopeless love for her best friend, Mark. 

Then Stacy discovers Older Me is a liar.

Still reeling from that betrayal, Stacy is targeted again by her most persistent tormentor. Only this time, he’s used her own artwork to humiliate her – and threaten her last chance with Mark.

She’s reached breaking point.

Literally.

__________________________________

coffee to goCoffee To Go: Well, it kept me up until 4:30am the night before an 8am test. It was that intriguing. Stacy makes you want to fight for her. She’s not a pushover. Salter is great at believable plot twists; the story never got boring for me. The most accurate description? Raw. On every level.

Characters—

Stacy: I wouldn’t say I necessarily liked her. I always support fighters who are direct in their approach and Stacy wasn’t that. But I definitely empathized with her; my heart went out to her and her conflicts within herself and with other characters are very realistic.

Older Me: At some times, very enigmatic. I liked it. At others, it seemed like I could see right through her. I think Salter did a great job making Older Me a character full of intrigue, uncertainty, and foreshadowing.

Mark: Oh, so clueless, boyish, and…realistic! As the reader, I didn’t see Mark the way Stacy sees him. Instead, I saw the way Stacy saw him and I saw the way the rest of the world would see him. (That’s a lot of “saws”). Anyway, I really respected Salter for making Mark a round character whom one might actually meet in a high school. He’s not some formulaic love interest full of mystery and unrequited love and brooding, yet he still cares deeply for Stacy. In short, I adore the mistakes he makes!

Finn: Can we not discuss him? Like, is he worthy to be deemed human? Finn, Stacy’s most enthusiastic tormentor, needs an attitude check and a life. He’s awful—almost too awful to be believable. I can’t decide whether that’s a flaw or a strength.

The Themes—

I didn’t feel like Salter communicated any strong themes in Breakable, but I did get a sense of some definite ideas. I think this book is a good lesson to people about what really goes on in the mind of someone who is bullied. It also reminds us of the importance of showing compassion to those teenagers. Honestly, I was beyond angry at everyone in the book who blames Stacy for being bullied. …Then, very guiltily, I realized that I would probably have a similar mindset. Wow. Reality check.

Final Thoughts—

I usually don’t review for self-published authors, but I’m really glad I reviewed for Aimee. She’s a brilliant writer—especially when it comes to plots—and has a lot of potential. Something tells me this will be the first of several novels with which readers will identify. I highly recommend that you read Breakable. You can buy it here for only a couple bucks. It’s definitely worth it.

**The author provided me with a free copy of this book in exchange for my honest opinion. I was not compensated in any way.

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So, remember that time I MET Veronica Roth?

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Sorry about the blurriness, but I may possibly have fangirled a lot tonight.

I met my writing idol.

Her name is Veronica Roth.

And she’s pretty cool.

My thoughts for the last hour have been, “hrufijoweosdjfkbiehufsjdkmlaodksnjfbjghjd” on replay.

Wow,

I got to ask her a couple of questions, and, ladies and gentlemen, when asked what kind of dinosaur she could be, she told me she’d choose to be any one with a long neck, just like Littlefoot from “Land Before Time.” How many of you remember that show?

When she addressed all of us, she told us that since NY got to meet a couple of Divergent cast members (what!!!), she would read us a deleted scene from the Divergent short stories. It was the (spoiler) scene in which Tris jumps into Dauntless headquarters…from Four’s perspective!! I died. It was beautiful.

My best friend and fellow Divergent fangirl, Tyler-Marie, went with me, and told Veronica thank-you for enduring the process from formulating an idea in her head to getting it published because it inspired her as a future writer to change lives just as Veronica had.

You know what Veronica said?

“YES. Write it down. Do it!!!”

She was pretty great, folks.

If you haven’t started devouring the Divergent trilogy, you need to do so ASAP. Plus, for all you “I-just-can’t-wait”-ers, all three books are published, as of yesterday. You won’t regret it.

If y’all have any questions, I’m happy to answer them! Today was amazing!

Oh, the joys of fandom.

This week could be life-changing for me. I say could be” because, well, it could not be. Tomorrow, I will arise in the wee hours of the morning–okay, so more like 5:30–and embark on a journey–so what if it’s only an hour!–to my local bookstore. 

“Why the theatrics?” you ask?

I can hear that question echoing in each of your minds.

Well, my dearest cyber-friends, my fellow bookworms, I shall, within the next twenty-four hours, be holding in my hands a copy of Veronica Roth’s Allegiant. If you have not tasted the riches of her Divergent trilogy, you, my friend, are depriving yourself.

I know, I know, you’re probably thinking that I did not answer your question satisfactorily because why on earth would I be freaking out over the book itself? To be fair, I probably would be in a tizzy over the book itself, but that alone is not why I’ve assumed a grave, melodramatic tone today. Along with my book, I–if everything goes as planned–will also hold in my hands a wristband to meet my Young Adult literary idol, Veronica Roth.

The problem?

I am absolutely paranoid that something will go wrong!

You know that feeling when you want something sooooo badly that you’re almost sure it’s too good to be true? That’s my entire being at the moment. If, indeed, I get to meet Veronica, I will update you as quickly as I can.

I will leave you with a meme that encompasses the majority of my emotions and attention span at the moment:

And, for the record, I DO think I do all of these things. Well, maybe not the bottom left…

Divergent On Set!

For those of you fellow Divergent lovers, here is the new MTV  sneak peak into the movie set. I’m trying really hard not to completely fan girl right now, but…

WATCH IT HERE and you will understand.

Theo James could not be more perfect to play Four. The rest of the cast is great, sure, but Theo. Is. Four. After you watch the video, please comment or tweet me your thoughts! I am dying to discuss my excitement with someone!

-coffeeshopreader

Harry Truman: “Leaders are Readers”

Yes, you read that correctly. How, do you ask, can someone who spends every spare minute of their time poring over words on a page, sometimes more than once, twice, or three times, be someone who leads others? It’s simple, really. Reading gives us imagination. Immersing ourselves in stories in which an orphan with a scar on his forehead discovers he is, in fact, a wizard with a destiny, the Chosen One, rescued and empowered by his mother’s sacrificial love, in which four siblings enter a magical world through a wardrobe and meet a lion and a witch, in which a girl is born into a city where a person’s faction comes before blood and everyone’s minds are supposed to work a certain way; in which a boy with dyslexia, ADHD, a satyr for a best friend and a sword-pen embarks on numerous quests and defies the gods of Olympus, and in which a girl witnesses a demon’s death while in a nightclub with her nerdy best friend strips away the barriers of impossibility that we face daily. While we go about our daily routines—the one’s in which we must return to real life—we take with us a valuable tool: a reader’s eye.

What would this building look like in an apocalypse?

What if this garden were a doorway to a faerie world hidden right under our noses?

What would the world look like if love were treated as a deadly disease?

Would my mind be able to overcome a serum-induced simulation?

I know, I know, you’re still probably wondering how any of this makes us leaders. Creativity, flexibility, and the ability to draw from the experiences of others all enhance our skills and decision-making. While we may not have attended Hogwarts, fought demons, or faced Dauntless initiation in our endless days of school, work, and bill-paying, we have experienced—through a character—the gain and loss of love, the importance of purpose, the thrill of adventure, the beauty of self-sacrifice, the value of friendship, and many others. This isn’t to say that those who prefer sitcoms, movies, live theater, or reality itself are not as good as readers, but much of TV and movies gives you everything. You can’t internalize a TV show like you can a character or a story or a world inside of a book. We take the words and descriptions that the author gives us and we put the finishing touches on what we see in our mind’s eye. We interpret literature according to our life’s experiences, successes, and failures; we make it our own.

Just some thoughts. I’m new at this, okay? 🙂

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